Open Canon XA30 AVCHD .mts files in Final Cut Pro X

Don’t know how to transfer Canon XA30 AVCHD .mts files to FCP X for editing? This article will teach you how to. Read on.

Canon XA30 captures AVCHD up to 1920×1080 video at 23.98p, 29.97p, 59.94p, and 59.94i frame rates. AVCHD uses the MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 standard, supporting a variety of standard, high definition, and stereoscopic (3D) video resolutions. The problem is that the advanced compression method of H.264 is not so friendly for editing software including Final Cut Pro (X). Below, we will outline how to import MTS files from Canon XA30 to FCP for further editing without any issue. Keep reading.

As one of the most popular non-linear editing systems, FCP X allows for film editing, uncompressed standard definition (SD) video and high definition (HD) editing and finishing. Currently, the best supported format for FCP X is Apple ProRes. Therefore, if you transfer Canon XA30 MTS files into FCP X for editing, you’d better get a professional third party program to change MTS to ProRes codec. Here you can get Brorsoft MTS/M2TS Converter for Mac to achieve the goal effortlessly.

It helps users to transcode Canon XA30 AVCHD MTS files to the optimal preset profiles for Final Cut Pro (Apple ProRes), Avid Media Composer (DNxHD), Adobe Premiere Pro (MPEG-2), iMovie (AIC) and more. And if you wanna get Apple ProRes codec on Windows, please turn to Brorsoft MTS Converter. Download the software on computer and follwo the guide below to start conversion.

Convert Canon XA30 MTS clip to Apple ProRes for FCP

1: You need to install and run the Mac MTS Converter and load your Canon XA30 .mts files to it by clicking “Add” button. Or you can drag&drop the files into the program directly.

2: Click on the Format box and select a proper format in dropdown-list. To import XA30 videos to Final Cut Pro X or FCP 6/7, you are advised to choose “Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov)”or “Apple ProRes 422 HQ (*.mov)” format for Final Cut Pro.

3: Adjust the video and audio parameters including the Bitrate of Video&Audio, Video Size, Sample Rate, Frame Rate, Audio Channels, etc., by clicking the Settings button for getting the best quality before starting conversion.

4: Finally, tap “Convert” button to start the Canon XA30 MTS conversion on Mac OS X. Once the conversion finished, you can smoothly edit the converted MTS files in FCP perfectly.

Read More:

How to Edit Canon XA30 MTS videos in Premiere Pro
How to Open Canon XA35 MTS videos in FCP
How to Import Canon C100 MTS videos in Sony Vegas

Panasonic HC-V770 MTS no sound in FCP X-Fixed

No audio output while importing Panasonic HC-V770 MTS clips to FCP X? This article will teach you how to freely edit Panasonic HC-V770 MTS videos in FCP X.

After upgrading to macOS High Sierra, recently Final Cut has stopped playing audio within MTS files, though it can be played well in QuickTime, VLC, etc. I saw a lot of users encountered such issues like me while importing MTS files to FCP.

“Hi. Please whenever I import my footage from Pansonic HC-V770 MTS to FCP X for editing, all i get is the video, no video at all. Even when i try to play it from monitor source, still no audio. But when i import to CS4, CS5 I get audio. Please help”

I have solved the issue, there was some kind of audio app called Perian running in the System Preferences which was causing issues with Final Cut audio. I am still experiencing instability with the program, but at least the audio now works as before. If you have Perian installed try disabling it in System Preferences/Perian. Also, uncheck the box to automatically update the program.

Next open Final Cut, Click Final Cut Pro in the menu bar and select Preferences.
Select General, Audio Units and click Validate on next Launch.
Quit Final Cut, re-open and try to import your footage. After doing this, it worked for me.

If you still can not get the audio output, you’d better get a third party program to encode Panasonic HC-V770 MTS to ProRes for FCP X editing. What I am recommended is Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac.

With it, you can easily transcode Panasonic HC-V770 AVCHD to Apple ProRes 422, ProRes 4444 for Final Cut Pro on Mac within few clicks. Besides Apple ProRes codec, it also offers optimized codecs for other NLEs such as MPEG-2 for Premiere, DNxHD for Avid, AIC for iMovie and more. If you are a PC user, pls turn to Brorsoft MTSConverter windows version. Now, download the software on computer and follow the guide below to start conversion.

How to Edit  Panasonic HC-V770 MTS files in FCP X

Step 1: Download, install and launch the best Panasonic MTS to ProRes Converter to import your .mts/.m2ts footages to it.

Step 2: Click format bar to choose “Apple ProRes” codec for AVCHD videos. You are provided with five Apple ProRes options listed as below. You can choose a proper one that fit your needs best according to the main difference of the five ProRes codecs. You’re recommended to choose “Final Cut Pro -> Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov)”, it’s best for FCP editing.

Step 3: You can click settings button in the main interface to adjust the output parameters, such as resolution, frame rate, etc, customize the parameters as you want.

Step 4: Hit “Convert” button to start transcoding Panasonic HC-V770 MTS to Apple ProRes codec on Mac OS X. This conversion process will finish soon. Afterwards, click the “Open” button to locate the output files and import to FCP X/7/6.

In this way, you can easily import and edit your Panasonic HC-V770 AVCHD video files in Final Cut Pro X/7/6 with ProRes codec smoothly.

Read More:

How to Edit Panasonic AC90 MTS files in Premiere
2017 Top 5 MTS/M2TS Converter for Mac Review
How to Convert 3D MTS to 3D SBS MP4

Open Panasonic HDC-SD90 MTS videos in FCP, iMovie, FCE

This article teaches you how to freely import and edit Panasonic HDC-SD90 MTS videos in FCP, iMovie, FCE. Keep reading.

A lot of users encountered issue while trying to import HDC-SD90 footage on Mac.

“I collected a lot of MTS files from Panasonic HDC-SD90, an old camcorder. Anyway, I wanna import MTS videos to FCP for editing. Do you know how to do this easily?”

Panasonic’s HDC-SD90 High Definition Camcorder grabs photographers’ and shutterbugs’ attention with its 3D recording and the amazing capability to capture super-smooth 1080/60p or 1080/50p footage. To edit, play or share Panasonic HDC-SD90 1080p MTS video on Mac, you will need to convert SD90 AVCHD MTS first. Only by converting can you avoid video playback, editing and importing problems due to the recorded AVCHD format.

There are a lot of converting programs online for you to choose. What I used is Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac. is a professional Mac application for converting AVCHD files from Sony/Panasonic/Canon HD camcorders that produce .mts, .m2ts, or .m2t files. And it can help you transform the Panasonic AVCHD file for editing with non-linear editing systems like iMovie, FCE, Final Cut Pro, Avid MC, Premiere Pro etc. or playing back in quicktime on Mac. If you wanna get ProRes codec on PC, then Brorsoft MTS Converter windows version is your first choice. Now, download the software on computer and follow the guide below to start conversion.

How to Convert Panasonic HDC-SD90 MTS videos on Mac

Step 1. Launch Brorsoft MTS/M2TS Converter on Mac and then click “Add” button to import the MTS videos to the software.

Step 2. Click format column and choose the output format.

You can choose Final Cut Pro -> Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov), this codec is optimized for FCP editing;

You can also choose Avid Media Composer -> Avid DNxHD (*.mov), it’s for Avid editing;

For playback, you can choose HD Video -> QuickTime MOV;

For sharing on website like YouTube, you can choose MP4 format for output.

Step 3. Tap Convert button to start converting Panasonic HDC-SD90AVCHD videos on Mac.

That’s all. After conversion, you can get the generated videos under “Open” panel for editing and playing. Enjoy!

Read More:

How to Edit Canon C100 MTS files in Vegas
2017 Top 5 MTS/M2TS Converter for Mac Review
How to Convert 3D MTS to 3D SBS MP4

How to Change AVCHD MTS to ProRes for FCP editing

Wanna import AVCHD MTS videos to FCP with Apple ProRes codec? This article will teach you how to convert .mts/.m2ts files to ProRes.

One of the most common questions that I get from people regarding the breed of HD-DSLR cameras is “What’s your post-workflow of AVCHD with FCP?”

“Hi guys, I shot something with the .mts format via Canon. My understanding is that AVCHD is extremely compressed. Do I need to encode AVCHD to FCP  friendly format so that I can edit AVCHD .mts videos in FCP?”

Simply put – all you need to do is to convert the native footage from the Canon, Sony, Panasonic .etc from the AVC H.264 format to a format that your computer and software will support. For me it’s simple given that I work with Final Cut Studio – Apple’s ProRes codec. What this means is that I simply convert the AVCHD footage to ProRes, the higher quality (and less compressed) codec with a professional third party program-Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac.

With it, you can easily transcode AVCHD to Apple ProRes 422, ProRes 4444 for Final Cut Pro on Mac within few clicks. Besides Apple ProRes codec, it also offers optimized codecs for other NLEs such as MPEG-2 for Premiere, DNxHD for Avid, AIC for iMovie and more. If you are a PC user, pls turn to Brorsoft MTS Converter windows version. Now, download the software on computer and follow the guide below to start conversion.

How to Change AVCHD .mts to ProRes

Step 1: Download, install and launch the best MTS to ProRes Converter to import your .mts/.m2ts footages to it.

Step 2: Click format bar to choose “Apple ProRes” codec for AVCHD videos. You are provided with five Apple ProRes options listed as below. You can choose a proper one that fit your needs best according to the main difference of the five ProRes codecs. You’re recommended to choose “Final Cut Pro -> Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov)”, it’s best for FCP editing.

Step 3: You can click settings button in the main interface to adjust the output parameters, such as resolution, frame rate, etc, customize the parameters as you want.

Step 4: Hit “Convert” button to start transcoding AVCHD to Apple ProRes codec on Mac OS X. This conversion process will finish soon. Afterwards, click the “Open” button to locate the output files and import to FCP X/7/6.

In this way, you can easily import and edit your AVCHD video files in Final Cut Pro X/7/6 with ProRes codec smoothly.

Read More:

How to Edit Canon C100 MTS files in Vegas
2017 Top 5 MTS/M2TS Converter for Mac Review
How to Convert 3D MTS to 3D SBS MP4

Solution-Convert MTS files to ProRes 422

The guide tells you how to convert AVCHD to Apple ProRes 422 codec so that you can edit MTS files in FCP with ProRes codec.

“I am editing two streams of footage shot on a Canon Vixia HF M41 and a Canon XA10. I’m editing in FCP X and what I wondering is whether anything useful is accomplished by transcoding the MTS files into ProRes codec 442 or any of ProRes codecs?”

Highly compressed H.264 codec of AVCHD format makes FCP hard to deal with during video editing. Instead, ProRes, a lossy video compression format that developed by Apple Inc., is a appropriate format for smooth editing on Mac. (Refer to AVCHD vs ProRes) That’s the reason why so many editors are willing to encode MTS video format to Apple ProRes 422 before editing.

To convert MTS to ProRes 422 quickly and easily, Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac is highly recommended. This program features high efficiency and seamless conversion. With it, you can do batch conversion from AVCHD to ProRes in a minute. If you wanna get ProRes codec on PC, Brorsoft MTS Converter Windows version is your first choice. Here’s how to do it.

How to Transcode MTS to ProRes 422

Step One: Click “Add” button to import MTS videos to the program or you can directly drag&drop the files into the program.

Step Two: Go to the “Format”bar and get the dropdown menu, then choose “Final Cut Pro> Apple PreRes 422″ or “Apple ProRes 422 HQ” or “Apple ProRes 4444″ as the output format.

Tip: Go to “Settings” page to adjust video size, bit rate, frame rate, sample rate and audio channels if it does not meet your demands.

Step Three: Tap Convert button to start transcoding MTS to Apple ProRes for Final Cut Pro instantly.

The conversion will be finished soon. After that you can transfer your MTS clips into Final Cut Pro for editing smoothly on Mac with ease.

Read More:

How to Edit MTS videos in FCP on macOS Sierra
Fixed-MTS videos no audio in Premiere 2015.4
How to Open MTS videos in Davinci Resolve 12

FCP M2TS: How to Transcode M2TS files to Apple ProRes for FCP

The article offers you a darn easy M2TS to FCP solution for importing your M2TS files to FCP with Apple ProRes codec.

The .m2ts is a filename extension used for the BDAV MPEG-2 Transport Stream container file format. It is used for multiplexing audio, video and other streams. Many AVCHD camcorders, such as the Sony, Panasonic, Canon capture videos in m2ts video formats. After recording, many users are eager to open M2TS files into FCP or other NLEs for further editing. This article will teach you how to edit M2TS videos in FCP smoothly.

Situation One: M2TS videos are compatible with FCP

1. Connect camcorder with your Mac via USB, and it will show up as a drive on the desktop
2. Hit Cmd-Shift-8 to open the Log&Transfer window (FCP 6 or above) to import the videos

Although Log&Transfer can be considered as one of useful ways for transferring M2TS files into FCP, it costs a lot of time on rendering process. Moreover, some videos will be played jerkly with poor sound in FCP preview window. The reason why users meet such problem is much simple: M2TS is not a native video format to FCP. If the MTS/M2TS files are incompatible with FCP, you need to convert them to FCP friendly format-Apple ProRes with a third party program.

Situation Two: M2TS videos are incompatible with FCP

There are a lot of professional tools online for you to choose. Here we recommend Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac to you which is recognized as one of the best AVCHD video converting tools on the market. With it, users can directly convert AVCHD.MTS/.M2TS (1080p60/50 included) to FCP natively supported Apple ProRes without quality loss. What’s more, besides FCP preset outputs, this Mac AVCHD converter also offers other optimized codecs for NLEs, like AIC for iMovie, MPEG-2 for Adobe Premiere, DNxHD for Avid Media Composer and more. Now download the software on Mac (Yosemite included) and follow the below guide to learn how to encode M2TS videos to FCP.

How to Make M2TS videos editable in FCP without trouble

Step 1: Install and run the best Mac M2TS to FCP Converter, you can click “Add Video” button to load AVCHD M2TS source files. Or you can drag&drop the video files into program directly.

Step 2: Click on “Format” bar and set a FCP friendly format in dropdown-list. You are advised to choose “Final Cut Pro-Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov)” format as output.

Tip: Before conversion, you are allowed to click the “Settings” button to customize proper video/audio parameters including Video size, bitrate and fame rate .etc

Step 3: Tap “Convert” button to start transcoding the MTS/M2TS to Apple ProRes 422 codec. After conversion just click the “Open” button to locate converted video files for FCP

Now Launch Final Cut Pro, choose File >> Import >> Files…, to open the encoded videos in FCP.

Related Guides:
Top 5 MTS/M2TS Converter Review
How to Edit Canon C100 MTS Videos in Premiere
How to Convert Canon C100 to FCP

ProRes Windows Converter-Convert MTS to ProRes on Windows

Wanna convert MTS videos to Apple ProRes on Windows? This article will teach you convert MTS to ProRes 422 codec on Windows with Brorsoft ProRes Windows Converter.

“Is Prores encoding available on windows? I need to finish my work on converting MTS videos to ProRes. But my worklap Mac is at home. And currently, there is only a PC at hand. Is it possible get ProRes codec on Windows?”

Apple’s ProRes family of codecs is integral to the workflow of many a camera these days. Whether you’re offline editing video clips or working right off camera negative, there’s a good chance you’re doing it in ProRes — which in turn means you’re probably doing it in Mac OS X. Until recently, Windows/PC users have struggled to encode in ProRes 422. Now, a piece of good news for Windows users, you can encode videos to Apple ProRes freely on PC.

Thanks to a program called Brorsoft MTS Converter, Apple ProRes codec on Windows is not an issue anymore! Here is a tutorial on how to encode your videos in the ProRes 422 format.

How to Enocde MTS to ProRes on Windows

This Windows ProRes Converter is good at encoding AVCHD .mts/.m2ts videos to Apple ProRes. Besides ProRes, it also offers optimized codecs for other NLEs, such as DNxHD for Avid, MPEG-2 for Vegas/Premiere, WMV for Windows Movie Maker, AVI for Pinnalce and so on. If you are a Mac user, then Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac is designed for you.

STEP 1. Run the ProRes Windows Converter you have downloaded; click “Add” icon to load your source video files. Or you can directly drag&drop videos into program.

STEP 2. Go to “Format” bar and choose “Final Cut Pro > Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov)” as output format for editing footage in FCP 6/7/X.

STEP 3. If you’d like to customize advanced audio and video parameters like Video Codec, aspect ratio, bit rate, frame rate, Audio codec, sample rate, audio channels, pls turn to “Settings” page.

STEP 4. Tap the convert button; it will start converting MTS to ProRes .mov for importing to FCP 6/7/X instantly. After conversion, just get the generated ProRes files for natively editing in FCP 6/7/X via “Open” panel.

Read More:

Top 5 MTS/M2TS Converter Review
How to Edit Canon C100 MTS Videos in Premiere
How to Convert Canon C100 to FCP

Canon MTS in FCP 7-Import Canon C100 MTS videos in FCP 7

This article will teach you how to edit Canon C100 MTS videos in FCP 7 with ProRes codec.


I have been shooting on the Canon C100 and plan to edit MTS files in FCP 7. However when I try to link the raw MTS files, Final Cut Pro doesn’t recognise them. I also tried log and transfer, it was useless. That’s much frustrated. After searching on Google, I got some clues. If you also meet such trouble, keep reading.

Some guys in creativecow.com mentioned that FCP doesn’t work with the raw AVCHD files. What we need to do is media manage the cut and reimport the footage at a higher resolution, like ProRes 422. Not HQ, that’s overkill and the only gains we make are in file size, not quality…as HQ is meant for 10 bit formats, and AVCHD is 8-bit…

Therefore, I turn to test some third party programs to convert Canon C100 MTS to Apple ProRes. There are a numbers of encoding programs online if you are digging on Google. Based on countless tests, I finally chose Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac.

With it, we can easily rewrap and transcode Canon C100 AVCHD MTS to ProRes codec, which ensures the best result when working with Final Cut Pro 7/X. Besides, ProRes codec, it offers other optimized codecs for NLEs like DNxHD for Avid, AIC for iMovie, MPEG-2 for Premiere and more. If you wanna get ProRes codec on PC, then Brorsoft MTS Converter windows version is your first choice. Now, download the software on computer and let’s start conversion.

How to Open Canon C100 MTS videos in FCP 7

Step One: Set up the video converter app on your computer, and then Click Add Video button to load your source files from your C100 camera. You can directly drag and drop the MTS videos stored on your computer’s hard disk drive to the program.

Step Two: Click on “Format” bar and set a FCP friendly format in dropdown-list. You are advised to “Follow Final Cut Pro” template and “Apple ProRes 422 (*.mov)” format.

Tip: Go to “Settings” page, and customize proper video/audio parameters if necessary. Video size, bitrate and fame rate are flexible and can be adjusted as you like.

Step Three: When everything is OK, click Convert button to start converting Canon C100 MTS to Final Cut Pro editable Apple ProRes 422 codec. Once the conversion finished, click “Open” button to get the generated ProRes MOV files.

Finally, launch Final Cut Pro, choose File > Import > Files…, and browse to where you save the converted AVCHD clips to. Choose the videos that you’d like to add.

AVCHD VS ProRes-Encode MTS to ProRes

This article offers the comparison between AVCHD and ProRes and tells you how to encode AVCHD video format to Apple ProRes codec.

AVCHD and Apple’s ProRes codec family are becoming the common formats in production and postproduction, but how much do you really know about AVCHD and ProRes? This article will offers the comparison between AVCHD and ProRes.

There is a video in YouTube which does side by side comparisons. In this video, many people totally confused that it seems to be that ProRes has quality loss.

In fact, ProRes like Apple ProRes HQ looks better, in terms of quality and especially in motion. AVCHD loses “detail” (mosquito noise”) due to compression. Plus, your CPU will thank you for not having to deal with AVCHD compression during color and VFX work. For most of time, we’d better transcode AVCHD to ProRes is because it’s far less taxing for your computer to edit.

The more compressed a format is (AVCHD/H.264 = very compressed!) the more horsepower it takes to edit, because your computer has to spend processing power uncompressing that file. ProRes is not very compressed at all, so it makes an ideal editing format. There are a lot of programs online for you to choose to encode AVCHD videos into ProRes codec. What I used is Brorsoft MTS Converter for Mac (Windows version).

With it, you not only can convert AVCHD (MTS) videos to FCP (X) with preset Final Cut Pro output profiles Apple ProRes 422, Apple ProRes 422(HQ), Apple ProRes(LT), Apple ProRes(Proxy), Apple ProRes 4444, but also can transcode AVCHD videos Mac(Avid Media Composer, iMovie, FCE, Adobe Premiere Pro) compatible format.

Tips for AVCHD to ProRes conversion with AVCHD Converter
1. Join files: Tick the box “Merge into one” on the main interface.
2. Edit files: “3D” edit button will help you to trim, crop, add watermark of videos before conversion.
3. Adjust parameters: In “Settings” page, you can adjust parameter including Video Size, Video&Audio bitrate, Frame rate .etc before conversion.